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Bank of England set to keep rates unchanged before Brexit deadline

The Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) who are the policymakers at the Bank of England (BoE) are set to keep interest rates on hold at 0.75% this week.

The MPC are to give their decision officially at noon on Thursday, they are also set to provide positive news as the UK economy figures show gross domestic product (GDP) grew by 0.3% month-on-month in July.

Howard Archer, chief economic adviser to the EY Item Club said, “We expect interest rates to be kept at 0.75% with the MPC firmly in ‘wait and see’ mode.

“Current heightened domestic UK political uncertainties reinforce the case for the Bank of England maintaining a watching brief.”

Inflation has moved up slightly from 2% in June to 2.1% in July.

George Brown, at Investec Economics, said the BoE will have “plenty of domestic political developments to chew over.”

Adding, “It now seems a question of not if but when a snap general election will be held, with both sides of the House of Commons indicating a desire to go back to the electorate.

“Though the MPC will steer well clear of commenting on such sensitive matters, it will need to grapple with the implications of a possible change of government and with it a shift in Brexit policy.”

Source: London Loves Business

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UK mortgage approvals hit two-year high in July as market stabilises – BoE

British lenders approved the greatest number of mortgages in two years during July, adding to signs the housing market has stabilised from its pre-Brexit slowdown, official data showed on Friday.

The Bank of England said lenders approved 67,306 mortgages, up from 66,506 in June and more than any economist predicted in a Reuters poll that had pointed to 66,167 approvals for July.

Britain’s housing market has sagged since the 2016 Brexit referendum – especially in London and neighbouring areas – but has shown signs of a tentative recovery in recent months.

Earlier on Friday mortgage lender Nationwide said house price growth in annual terms inched up to a three-month high in August, although remained weak by recent standards.

The BoE said net mortgage lending rose by 4.611 billion pounds in July, the biggest increase since March 2016, while consumer lending increased by 0.897 billion pounds compared with a forecast rise of 1.0 billion pounds on the month.

Lending to businesses fell by 4.218 billion pounds last month, the sharpest fall since August 2017. While the series is volatile, the severity of the fall could be another sign of nerves in British companies as the Brexit crisis escalates.

Earlier on Friday Lloyds Bank said business confidence fell in August to its lowest level since late 2011.

Source: UK Reuters

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The only way is down for UK interest rates, say City economists

The UK economy is in contraction mode, but the Bank of England isn’t greatly worried. GDP fell by 0.2 per cent by the second quarter of the year as Brexit uncertainty and a global slowdown held growth back.

Policymakers at the BoE are reluctant to fiddle with interest rates as the Brexit date of 31 October looms. New Prime Minister Boris Johnson has made it abundantly clear that Britain could be crashing out of European Union without a deal.

Noises from the British economy last week will have comforted bosses at the Bank and cemented their “wait and see” position. Inflation was shown to have picked up to 2.1 per cent, wages grew at their fastest pace in 11 years, and July retail sales delivered a pleasant surprise.

It looks, then, like only the shock of a no-deal Brexit would cause Threadneedle Street to tamper with rates, which currently sit at 0.75 per cent. Yet the BoE has repeatedly said that in such an event rates could move “in either direction”.

City economists are not convinced by this argument from Mark Carney and co, however. Peter Dixon, economist at Commerzbank, says: “There would appear to be no good arguments in favour of a hike”.

The Bank’s logic is that a tumbling pound could push up the cost of imports and drive up prices. But Dixon says the effects would only be felt “over a six to 12 month horizon”.

Eventually, he says, the BoE will have “to weigh up” the risks to inflation versus the risks to growth. “But that will not be a calculation they have to make anytime soon”.

Oliver Blackbourn, portfolio manager on the multi-asset team at Janus Henderson, concurs. “In the higher-inflation, lower-growth environment expected,” he says, “the Bank of England will choose to primarily worry about the latter”.

He says lower availability of goods, services and workers for industry as well as consumers worrying about their incomes will weigh on economic growth. “This is likely to be the Bank’s main focus in its decision making.”

Turning the taps back on

Institute of Directors chief economist Tej Parikh says: “The precise shape of a no-deal Brexit and the scale of the government contingencies will play into the Bank’s final decision.”

Sajiv Vaid portfolio manager at Fidelity International takes a similar view, saying that in the event of a no deal, “the lesson to learn is that you cannot rule anything out”.

The shock could be so severe that policymakers might turn to the bazooka of stimulus bond-buying, or quantitative easing (QE), rather than the pistol of interest rate cuts. In even the relatively benign scenario modelled by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Britain would enter a recession in 2020 and unemployment would rise by 1.5 percentage points.

Dixon says: “The BoE can always resume asset purchases. After all, the BoE balance sheet is only around 28 per cent of GDP – a full 10 percentage points lower than [European Central Bank] levels”

Government help

Craig Erlam, senior market analyst at foreign exchange firm Oanda, says a no-deal Brexit would force “at least one rate cut and perhaps additional quantitative easing”. He says the Bank will be hoping that “unlike in the aftermath of the crisis, the government also plays a role in providing an economic buffer”.

Vaid agrees. “I think this time will be different and expect fiscal policy to play its part,” he says. Blackbourn also says he thinks rates would be lowered, “likely alongside a large fiscal easing from the government”.

Almost all economists disbelieve the Bank when it says interest rates could move either way if a no-deal Brexit comes around. Blackbourn says: “Despite the inflation-targeting mandate, the Bank’s first reaction will be to support growth and later worry about inflation.”

By Harry Robertson

Source: City AM

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Mark Carney says negative interest rates ‘not an option’ for BoE

Bank of England governor Mark Carney has said his institution will not pursue negative interest rates, a monetary policy device employed by the European Central Bank (ECB) and Bank of Japan, among others.

“At this stage we do not see negative rates as an option here. I am not criticizing others that have used them, but we don’t see it as an option,” he told Central Banking magazine earlier this month in an interview published today.

Negative interest rates seek to encourage banks to spend their spare money by penalising them for keeping it in their country’s central bank.

The BoE has been less willing to cut interest rates than some of its peers. The US Federal Reserve last month cut interest rates by 25 basis points (0.25 percentage points) and the ECB has heavily suggested further stimulus is coming.

Carney’s Bank has kept the main interest rate – which determines the cost of lending in the economy – at 0.75 per cent, citing high employment and inflation close to its two per cent target.

Yet a no-deal Brexit on 31 October, the date Britain is scheduled to leave the European Union, could cause the Bank to lower rates to support the economy during a likely shock.

Carney told Central Banking that negative interest rates can be “counter-productive”. He said the Bank’s view “is that the effective lower bound is close to zero, but positive – just above zero.”

The governor also said he does not think changing the Bank’s inflation target, which is set at two per cent, is a good idea.

“I am not a big fan of changing the target,” he said. “If you are having trouble getting to two per cent it is not clear to me why moving to three per cent really helps.”

The Bank’s favoured inflation rate was 2.1 per cent in July, official figures showed earlier this month. Inflation in the Eurozone, on the other hand, was just one per cent in July, official data showed today.

By Harry Robertson

Source: City AM

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Bank of England’s Haldane ‘very cautious’ about cutting rates

Bank of England chief economist Andy Haldane sought to push back against market bets that the central bank’s next move will be an interest rate cut, saying he would resist lowering borrowing costs unless there was a sharp downturn.

Haldane contrasted the BoE’s stance with that of the U.S. Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank – both of which are expected to loosen policy – and stressed again that even a disruptive no-deal Brexit would not bring an automatic rate cut.

He acknowledged that business investment was “strikingly subdued” as companies struggled with Brexit uncertainty.

“My personal view though is that I would be very cautious about considering a monetary policy loosening, barring some sharp economic downturn,” he said at an event for local businesses in Scunthorpe, northern England.

BoE Governor Mark Carney and others have also deflected the idea that the Monetary Policy Committee is thinking of cutting rates while a Brexit deal remains possible.

They say the pricing of rate futures has been distorted by the risk of Britain leaving the EU without a transition deal on Oct. 31, creating a tension between their forecasts and market assumptions.

“Monetary policymakers are often cast as one-club golfers. In the current conjuncture, the problem is more that the MPC does not know which of two quite different fairways it should be aiming at,” Haldane said in his speech.

“With the economic road ahead potentially forking, the case for holding rates until the road becomes clearer is strong.”

Britain’s economy appears to have slowed sharply during the three months to June, reflecting a lull after businesses rushed to prepare for Britain’s original EU exit date of March 29.

Some economists think the country risks slipping into recession especially if there is a no-deal Brexit.

But Haldane highlighted robust consumer spending and the strong labour market and said Britain’s economy was running at full capacity.

Even after a no-deal Brexit – something incoming prime minister Boris Johnson has said is prepared to do if the EU refuses to renegotiate the withdrawal deal – the case for a rate cut would not be clear-cut, Haldane said.

Carney and other BoE policymakers have said the BoE is more likely to cut rates than raise them after a no-deal Brexit.

Carney sounded less positive about the economy than Haldane when he said this month that underlying growth was running below its potential and relying heavily on household spending.

“PRISONER OF PAST”

Haldane used his speech to warn that markets and the public had grown too accustomed to ultra-low interest rates, a marked contrast in tone from 2016, when he defended “sledgehammer” stimulus after Britain voted to leave the EU.

“It is important that monetary policy is not a prisoner of its past, that the monetary cavalry are not called at the first whiff of grapeshot, that a dependency culture around monetary policy is not allowed to develop,” Haldane said.

“Super-charging the supply side of the economy is what is now needed,” he added.

On Monday Britain’s National Institute of Economic and Social Research said a no-deal Brexit would hit the economy’s supply capacity and lower economic output by 5% relative to a softer Brexit.

Haldane said there was no better time to sort out deep-seated structural issues around education, training and transport links.

Johnson has said he wants to cut income taxes for higher earners as well as raise payroll tax thresholds, which would represent a major loosening of Britain’s fiscal policy.

Reporting by David Milliken

Source: Yahoo Finance UK

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What to expect from Bank of England’s interest rate decision

The Bank of England (BoE) is set to leave interest rates unchanged this week but will likely try to convince investors rate hikes are around the corner.

The BoE will on Thursday publish the minutes of the latest Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) meeting and the committee’s decision on interest rates. Analysts think the MPC will vote unanimously to kept the benchmark bank borrowing rate unchanged at 0.75%.

“We expect unchanged policy and for the minutes to maintain the current rhetoric of a gradual path of rate hikes,” Barclays’ senior UK economist Sree Kochugovindan said in a note sent to clients last Friday.

The Bank of England has repeatedly signalled that it wants to gradually raise the benchmark interest rate, which remains at a historic low. But economists, analysts, and investors think hikes are unlikely as long as Brexit remains unresolved and the UK’s economy remains lukewarm at best. Market prices indicate investors believe a rate cut is more likely than a hike.

As a result, Bank of England governor Mark Carney and his colleagues will have to signal in the MPC minutes and Thursday’s press conference that they do actually plan to hike rates if they don’t want markets to get a shock.

“We do not expect the BoE to move interest rates higher unless or until there is some positive resolution to the Brexit saga,” Nomura’s George Buckley wrote in a note to clients last week.

As well as Brexit uncertainty, Credit Suisse said economic “risks have turned to the downside” since the MPC’s last meeting. The investment bank cited recent worsening UK manufacturing data, as well as ongoing trade tensions between the US and China, both of which could hit economic growth. Barclays last week cut its forecast for UK GDP growth in 2019 from 1.2% to 1.1% on similar concerns.

Against this backdrop, the central bank looks more likely to cut rates than to raise them. Lower interest rates should help boost growth by encouraging borrowing and spending.

However, the Bank of England has consistently said it wants to gradually raise interest rates — not cut them further. Carney has even suggested he could raise rates if there is a no-deal Brexit, counter to conventional logic.

In order to keep this path open, the BoE will have to prepare the market for future hikes. It will likely do so by sounding a “hawkish” tone in the public comments of the committee. (In central banking, “doves” favour low interest rate policy, while “hawks” favour higher interest rates.)

“The MPC will have to issue fresh, dovish guidance in order to satisfy markets on Thursday, which now think the Committee is more likely to cut than raise Bank Rate within the next six months,” Samuel Tombs, chief UK economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, said in a note to clients.

“But with clearer signs emerging that domestic price pressures are building, we expect the Committee to reiterate its commitment to ‘ongoing’ tightening and to repeat its May warning that markets’ expectations are out of line with reality.“

Even if Carney and his colleagues do strike a more “hawkish” tone, investors may remain out of step with the bank.

“Markets are pricing out any prospect of a rate hike from the BoE this year (amid a Fed-led collapse in global rate expectations),” Michael Ingram, the chief market analyst at WH Ireland, told Yahoo Finance UK. “So they can try and sound hawkish, but the market ain’t buying it.”

The Bank of England’s decision will come a day after the US Federal Reserve makes its latest call on interest rates. Investors believe the Fed will signal rate cuts later this year. This loosening of policy may undermine the BoE’s attempts to threaten future rate rises.

Aside from the tone of comments from MPC members, investors will be watching the balance of voting on the nine-member committee closely. If even one member dissents, it could send shockwaves through the market as investors shift bets towards a rate hike later this year.

“A couple of hawkish comments from Haldane and Saunders have made that meeting a little more interesting than it might have been,” Allan Monks, JPMorgan’s UK economist, said in a note to clients.

“But we expect there will be no dissents at next week’s meeting, with the BoE instead using its communications to push back against current market expectations for cuts.”

By Oscar Williams-Grut

Source: Yahoo Finance UK

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Pound Recovers After Wages Grow at Fastest Pace since 2008

  • Pound Sterling bid higher on better-than-expected labour market data
  • Annual wage growth hits highest level since financial crisis
  • Bets growing again that Bank of England to raise interest rates before year-end

Pound Sterling was seen staging a recovery against the Euro and U.S. Dollar in mid-morning trade on Tuesday, June 11 after UK labour market data showed wages continue to rise.

According to ONS data, average earnings, with bonuses included, grew 3.1% in April, which was faster than the 2.9% growth markets were expecting.

The average earnings rate, without bonuses included, grew 3.4% in April, taking the year-on-year growth rate to 3.8%, its highest growth rate since 2008.

With inflation standing at 2.1%, UK consumers find themselves in a position where pay is easily outstripping price increases.

“Sterling jumps above $1.27 and the only G10 currency in green against the U.S. Dollar after April’s nominal wage growth increases a whopping 3.8%, the fastest one-month increase since May 2008 (excluding bonuses),” says Simon Harvey, FX analyst at Monex Europe.

The beat on expectations saw the Pound catch a bid as markets reckoned the data keeps alive the prospect of a Bank of England interest rate rise being delivered before 2019 is out.

Pound vs. Euro labour market data release

Above: Sterling goes higher against the Euro following the release of UK labour market data.

Also proving supportive to Sterling was additional data that showed UK employment grew 32K in the three months to April, where markets were actually expecting employment to have contracted by 1K, ensuring the UK employment rate was estimated at 76.1%, higher than a year earlier (75.6%) and the joint-highest on record. The employment rate for women was 72.0%, the highest on record.

“The British labour market remains rather resilient and provides little cause for concern, as the unemployment rate continues to be unchanged at a very low level. Given that average earnings have improved steadily, we expect a slightly optimistic BoE in the near future,” says Marc-André Fongern, Head of FX Research at MAF Global Forex.

The Pound-to-Euro exchange rate is quoted at 1.1223 in the wake of the numbers, having been as low as 1.1193 earlier in the day. The Pound-to-Dollar exchange rate is quoted at 1.2709 having been as low as 1.2669. The data will come as a relief to the UK currency which remains has been caught in a relentless downtrend since early May, and we would expect any strength to be short-lived in nature as markets remain primarily focussed on UK political dynamics.

“Cutting through the political noise that dominates the column inches currently, sterling received a boost from another decent wage inflation release this morning. As I have suggested before, it was lagging earnings data which stayed the hands of the MPC previously when CPI was testing above 3%. Since this has flipped, and with headline inflation still remaining around target levels, it could be the wage data that tip’s the BoE towards a rate hike sooner than people realise,” says John Goldie, FX Dealer at Argentex, a foreign exchange brokerage.

The employment data suggests the Bank of England could raise interest rates sooner than financial markets expect. The data comes in the wake of BoE policymaker Michael Saunders comments made on Monday that the Bank would not necessarily wait until all Brexit uncertainties were resolved before raising interest rates again.

At a time when the U.S. Federal Reserve and European Central Bank are looking at potentially cutting interest rates, this stance should provide a supportive dynamic for Sterling against the Dollar and Euro.

Financial market pricing of future interest rates appear to betray an assumption that the BoE is more likely to cut rates than to raise them over the coming year, reflecting signs that trade conflict between the United States and China is hurting the world economy.

However, some analysts point out that the UK is not as exposed to international trade dynamics as the U.S. and Eurozone, and therefore the reasons for the Fed and ECB cutting interest rates do not necessarily translate into a ‘sympathy’ cut at the BoE.

If markets row back on their expectations for a BoE rate cut and align them once more with the view that a 2019 rate rise is likely, then we could well see Sterling find further support.

“This is a strong labour market report that bolsters the case of MPC members Andy Haldane and Michael Saunders who recently have re-emphasised the need for gradual increases in interest rates,” says Samuel Tombs, Chief U.K. Economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics. “With the labour market unlikely to weaken suddenly soon and government policies set to remain supportive of faster wage growth, the MPC can’t afford to ignore the constant inflation pressure now emitted by the labour market.”

Wage data dymamics

Image courtesy of Capital Economics.

Text-book central banking rules state that interest rates must rise in order to keep inflation at a sustainable level, and one of the main drivers of inflation is wage growth.

A typical side effect of interest rate rises is a stronger currency as global investors channcel capital to where returns are expected to be higher.

Commenting on the future of UK interest rates in a speech hosted by the Institute of Directors at Southampton’s Solent University, the BoE’s Saunders said, “we probably would have to return to something like a neutral stance earlier than markets project… I want to stress that the MPC does not necessarily have to keep rates on hold until all Brexit uncertainties are resolved.”

Indeed, the BoE has raised rates twice since Britain voted to leave the EU, in November 2017 and August 2018.

Saunders says the ‘neutral’ interest rate is at about 2.0%, suggesting the UK can absorb a number of interest rate rises.

Andy Haldane, the BoE’s chief economist, meanwhile said in an opinion piece in Saturday’s edition of the Sun newspaper that the time was nearing “when a small rise in rates would be prudent to nip any inflationary risks in the bud”.

Other analysts are more circumspect on the latest set of labour data, suggesting that wage growth will moderate over coming months and this could ease back on expectations for an interest rate rise.

“The pick-up in core earnings seems driven by temporary drivers, such as a one-off public sector pay band increase and a pick-up in whole economy hours worked rather than actual hourly earnings growth. We believe the pace of earnings growth is likely to slow and stabilise over the coming months,” says Fabrice Montagné, an analyst with Barclays.

Barclays expect the recent slowdown in UK growth, as evidenced by Monday’s GDP data, to translate into weaker labour market dynamics.

“Recruitment agents continue to signal that permanent job placements declined steadily between March and May, implying risks to employment ahead (Figure 4). Meanwhile, vacancy growth in May slowed further, and the hiring of temporary workers continued to outpace that of permanent staff, providing further evidence that job creation remains temporary given the uncertain backdrop,” says Montagné.

Written by Gary Howes

Source: Pound Sterling Live

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Pound gains on dollar as Carney says interest rate hikes still on table

BANK of England governor Mark Carney helped keep the pound above 1.27 dollars for a third day running on Thursday, as he said interest rate hikes were still on the table.

The pound was higher against the US dollar, climbing 0.11% to 1.270, following Mr Carney’s comments in the bank’s annual report.

Fiona Cincotta, senior market analyst at City Index, said: “Today’s weaker dollar was lending a hand to the pound, as did Mark Carney. The BoE Governor suggesting that the UK could still raise rates if the economy performs as expected was some welcome good news for the Brexit battered pound.”

But sterling was 0.45% lower against the euro at 1.125 as the common currency surged, boosted by a more positive than expected statement from the European Central Bank (ECB).

This impacted European markets, with the German Dax going into the close 0.23% lower while the French Cac was down 0.36%.

In London, the FTSE 100 was up by 39.63 points, or 0.55%, at 7,259.85.

Under-pressure city heavyweight Neil Woodford was dealt another major blow after St James’s Place ended its £3.5 billion association with his firm.

Shares in the FTSE 100 asset manager were down 5p to 1,037p.

Insurance giant Aviva announced plans to axe around 1,800 jobs in the next three years in a bid to save £300 million a year.

Investors reacted positively to the news, pushing shares up 3p to 413.6p.

Online car seller and trading platform Auto Trader continued its impressive growth with rising revenue and profit despite falling car sales throughout the sector, the company revealed.

Shares dipped 2.4p to close at 585p.

Go-Ahead, the transport company behind Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR), revealed strong growth across all three of its divisions.

Its shares surged on the news, jumping 197p to 2,080p.

Facilities management provider Mitie posted a better-than-expected 6% rise in annual underlying earnings to £88.2 million for the year to March 31.

Shares rose 7p to 146.5p, as the result came in higher than feared after Mitie had warned over earnings and falling orders in March.

Entertainment One shares soared after the Peppa Pig maker denied reports that its president is set to leave the firm.

Shares spiked by almost 16%, climbing 55.4p to 405.4p, after the TV and film production business reassured investors that Mark Gordon, president and chief content officer, will remain at the firm.

Engine maker Rolls-Royce announced it had offloaded a £4.6 billion chunk of its pension scheme covering 33,000 members to Legal & General, in the biggest deal of its kind in the UK.

Shares were up 11p at 894p.

Oil prices were little changed, having slumped in the previous session when the Energy Information Administration update showed that US oil stockpiles have significantly jumped.

A barrel of Brent Crude oil was trading at $60.46, down 0.13%.

The biggest risers on the FTSE 100 were Imperial Brands up 112p to 2,073p, British American Tobacco up 87p to 2,915.5p, United Utilities Group up 22.4p to 829.6p and Severn Trent up 47p to 2,046p.

The biggest fallers on the FTSE 100 were Taylor Wimpey down 12.65p to 156.5p, Kingfisher down 10.5p to 207.6p, Hargreaves Lansdown down 81.5p to 1,900p and Vodafone Group down 5.12p to 127.98p.

Source: Herald Scotland

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May Quitting Throws Bank of England Governor Race Into Unknown

A new prime minister — and the new chancellor of the exchequer that might accompany them — could have very different priorities from May and Philip Hammond, potentially opening the door for a different slate of candidates for the top BOE job. The finance chief is the one formally responsible for making the appointment.

The prime minister’s decision also ups the uncertainty faced by the U.K., which Hammond has previously acknowledged could deter candidates. Potential governors don’t have long to make up their mind. The closing date for applying for the BOE role is June 5 — two days before May will stand down — with a decision due in October. A new prime minister is likely to be in place by the end of July.

“Not only do we not know who’s in the running and who is actually possible, but we also don’t know who is going to be making that choice — or, to be honest, even which party may be making the decision,” said George Buckley, chief U.K. economist at Nomura in London.

If a Brexiteer succeeds May, it could lead to an awkward end to the tenure of Mark Carney, who is set to leave the role in January. In the meantime, the change of leadership leaves the Canadian facing a tricky policy dilemma of whether he should keep preparing the ground for the interest-rate hikes he says are needed while further uncertainty stalks the economy.

Carney has come under frequent criticism from anti-European Union politicians, many of whom consider him to have been overly gloomy on Britain’s prospects. While Hammond has been a more sympathetic ear in the Treasury, the relationship could be more strained if one of Carney’s prominent critics takes the role.

In a Bloomberg TV interview Friday, Roger Bootle, chairman of Capital Economics and a member of pro-Brexit group Economists for Free Trade, said that a new chancellor was almost certain.

“I would be very surprised if any new prime minister stuck with the current one,” he said.

While a Brexiteer PM might add some unexpected names in the race to replace Carney, a more orthodox candidate can’t be ruled out — especially if they are looking for a safer choice to burnish their economic credentials.

Jacob Rees-Mogg, an arch critic of Carney, suggested last year that Andrew Bailey, the chief executive officer of the Financial Conduct Authority, and BOE Chief Economist Andy Haldane — two men regularly cited as potential replacements — could take the job.

If front-runner Boris Johnson prevails, former adviser and pro-Brexit economist Gerard Lyons could be a potential choice for the central bank.

Hammond said the next BOE governor should have international status, prompting speculation that former Reserve Bank of India chief Raghuram Rajan could be in the frame. May, a former BOE economist, has also encouraged women to apply for the role.

Of course, the decision might not even be in the gift of the Conservative Party. If the leader calls a general election to buttress their position, Labour could seize power for the first time in almost a decade. The opposition party has explored proposals to change the BOE’s mandate, including targets for house-price inflation, productivity and climate change.

By David Goodman and Lucy Meakin

Source: Yahoo Finance UK

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Further Brexit delay would hit UK economy – BoE’s Broadbent

Britain’s economy risks damage if Brexit is delayed beyond its latest Oct. 31 deadline because companies would continue to hold back on investment, Bank of England deputy governor Ben Broadbent was quoted as saying on Monday.

“It’s pretty clear that investment has been feeling the consequences of the uncertainty about Brexit and particularly the possibility of a bad outcome,” Broadbent told the Press Association news agency.

“If you continually expect news to arrive imminently – a resolution – then that can have quite a depressing effect on investment,” he said.

By contrast, a Brexit deal would lead to “quite a strong bounce-back in investment.”

Broadbent reiterated the BoE’s guidance that future interest rate increases would be limited and gradual, adding the “emphasis is on the ‘gradual’ bit of limited and gradual.”

He said he did know whether the British central bank would need to increase rates or cut them in the event of a no-deal Brexit shock to the economy.

“I don’t know. I really don’t, because I don’t know how much the exchange rate will move,” he said.

Several other top BoE officials, including Governor Mark Carney, have said a rate cut would probably be needed to help the economy weather the shock of leaving the European Union with no deal.

On whether he will put his name forward as a candidate to succeed Mark Carney as BoE governor, Broadbent said: It’s a big job…I have lots of things to think about before I make that decision.”

Writing by William Schomberg; Editing by Peter Graff

Source: UK Reuters